The ICTY, Seselj and provisional release

09 July 2014 by IJT

Vojislav Seselj voluntarily surrendered to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), in February 2003, to answer accusations of war crimes and crimes against humanity for his role during the expulsion of non-Serbs from parts of Croatia and Bosnia between 1991 and 1993. Eleven and a half years on, the leader of the Serb Radical Party (SRS) remains in the custody.

His trial ended in March 2012, but the verdict is not expected soon and the court, concerned about the accused’s health, recently deemed it “appropriate to obtain the view of the parties on possible provisional release of the accused”. The ICTY has asked Seselj to declare in writing that he will comply with the conditions of his possible provisional release. The tribunal wants him to be placed under supervision of the Serbian authorities, under house arrest. In a response to the court, Seselj said, on 17 June, he had no intention to comply with the terms and that he would take part in the political life, appear in public and criticize the tribunal in The Hague.

Tags: 

Want to read more?

We have tailor-made memberships for students, individuals, groups of professionals and large companies and organizations. A subscription entitles you to receive the International Justice Tribune every two weeks as well as become a member of the Justice Tribune Foundation, supporting independent reporting on international justice.

Subscribe now

Related articles

article
Supporters await the arrival of Vojislav Seselj at Belgrade airport after his provisional release in November 2014 (Photo: Joost van Egmond)
07 April 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

The Yugoslavia tribunal announced a new twist in its drawn-out case against Vojislav Seselj, when the appeals chamber ordered the trial chamber to revoke the provisional release of the firebrand Serbian politician. But it is unclear how the court might be able secure his return.

article
19 November 2014 by Stephanie van den Berg

Vojislav Seselj returned to Serbia last week after the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) released the Serb nationalist politician on health grounds in a controversial ruling that sought no assurances from the accused.

article
Serb ultra-nationalist politician Vojislav Seselj (Photo: Twitter/@seselj_vojislav)
31 March 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Serb ultra-nationalist politician Vojislav Seselj was acquitted Thursday of all nine charges of crimes against humanity and war crimes and is now a free man presiding judge Jean-Claude Antonetti of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) ruled. Seselj, already provisionally released on health grounds, was not present in court.

article
23 July 2014 by IJT

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) said on 17 July that it had decided to “terminate the process of provisional release” envisaged for the Serbian Radical Party (SRS) leader Vojislav Seselj during the last weeks [IJT-163]

article
11 June 2014 by Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

Prosecutors in Belgrade like to say that they have prosecuted more people than the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in the past decade. In ten years, the Belgrade war crimes court convicted 56 people among 170 indictees – while the ICTY indicted 161 suspects over twenty years. Although they are low level military officials, paramilitaries and local officials no higher than the level of mayor, given the scant resources and often lack lustre political support for prosecutions, this is no mean feat.