Karadzic conviction "seems virtually certain"

25 February 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

The International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has a busy month ahead. As it prepares to close its doors next year it will hand down verdicts in two of its last trials. The Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic will hear a judgement in his historic case on 24 March, which could expand genocide in Bosnia beyond Srebrenica. A week later judges will hand down their ruling in the trial of firebrand Serb politician Vojislav Seselj, which has been shrouded in controversy. IJT asked Marko Milanovic, associate professor of law at the University of Nottingham and longtime ICTY observer, about what’s at stake in both cases.

 

Radovan Karadzic before ICTY
Image caption: 
Radovan Karadzic at the start of his defence case before the ICTY in October 2013 (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)

Historically, the case of Radovan Karadzic is important; this was the top Bosnian Serb leader during the war. But what will this case add to the jurisprudence of the tribunal?

Want to read more?

We have tailor-made memberships for students, individuals, groups of professionals and large companies and organizations. A subscription entitles you to receive the International Justice Tribune every two weeks as well as become a member of the Justice Tribune Foundation, supporting independent reporting on international justice.

Subscribe now

Related articles

article
Radovan Karadzic before ICTY
24 March 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Judges of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) on Thursday convicted former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic of genocide for the 1995 Srebrenica massacre and nine other counts of war crimes and crimes against humanity. He was sentenced to 40 years in prison for his role in the 44-month siege of Sarajevo, the establishment of a network of detention camps in Prijedor where non-Serbs were abused and tortured and taking UN personnel hostage and many other crimes.

article
11 November 2009 by Sebastiaan Gottlieb

Radovan Karadzic conducts his own defence in his genocide trial, but he has an international team of top lawyers, academics and interns at his disposal. For months they have been preparing the defence of the former Bosnian-Serb leader. 

article
13 July 2010 by Hermione Gee

When Serge Brammertz took over as Chief Prosecutor for the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) in 2008, Radovan Karadzic was still on the run. Today he’s on trial, but two other men are still at large. Brammertz told the IJT why it’s so important to bring them to justice.

article
Radovan Karadzic at his initial appearance before the ICTY in July, 2008
08 October 2014 by Sandra Milic, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Prosecutors at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) last week demanded a life sentence for former Bosnian Serb leader Radovan Karadzic. He faces charges of genocide, war crimes and crimes against humanity during the bloody 1992-1995 Bosnian war.

article
Photo exhibit used in ICTY Srebrenica cases of a single shoe left at Branjevo Military Farm (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
07 July 2015 by Heikelina Verrijn Stuart and IJT

For IJT’s special issue acknowledging the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre, we are publishing an edited version of a November 2005 article [IJT-29] by international law expert Heikelina Verrijn Stuart. It illustrates how the ICTY was shaping the law of genocide a decade ago.