Bosnia

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ICTY prosecutor Serge Brammertz (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
13 November 2017 by Boro Kontic

On the eve of the verdict in the case of Bosnian Serb military commander Ratko Mladic ICTY prosecutor Serge Brammertz has given a lengthy interview to Serbian and Bosnian media. Here is shortened version of the interview conducted by Boro Kontic which has appeared in Novi magazine and Oslobodjenje newspaper. 

 

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Preparations for the burial of Srebrenica victims at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery for the Victims of the 1995 Genocide in 2010 (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
28 June 2017 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

The Srebrenica massacre always seems to boil down to numbers when it gets to court. I have sat through many hours of discussions about the actual number of victims, whether that number was large enough to constitute a genocide, the precise times to pinpoint who knew what and when at the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) and later in the genocide case before the International Court of Justice (ICJ).

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Serb ultra-nationalist politician Vojislav Seselj (Photo: Twitter/@seselj_vojislav)
31 March 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Serb ultra-nationalist politician Vojislav Seselj was acquitted Thursday of all nine charges of crimes against humanity and war crimes and is now a free man presiding judge Jean-Claude Antonetti of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) ruled. Seselj, already provisionally released on health grounds, was not present in court.

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ICTY and MICT president Judge Theodor Meron speaks to IJT (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
08 July 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg and Janet H. Anderson, The Hague (The Netherlands)

In the lead-up to the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre of nearly 8,000 Bosnian Muslims, IJT spoke to the president of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia. Judge Theodor Meron answered questions about the genocide and efforts to close the ICTY and hand over its remaining functions to the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT), where he also serves as president. 

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ICTY and MICT president Judge Theodor Meron speaks to IJT (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
08 July 2015

IJT 185 is a free special issue to mark the 20th anniversary of the Srebrenica massacre. The murder of some 8,000 Bosnian Muslim men and boys is the only atrocity in post-WWII Europe that was officially labeled a genocide by two international courts, and it has helped shape international laws on genocide. For this issue, International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) president Theodor Meron answers questions about handing over the court's remaining functions to the Mechanism for International Criminal Tribunals (MICT), where he also serves as president.

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Preparations for the burial of Srebrenica victims at the Srebrenica-Potočari Memorial and Cemetery for the Victims of the 1995 Genocide in 2010 (Photo: Stephanie van den Berg)
23 March 2015 by Joost van Egmond, Belgrade (Serbia)

In a police action hailed as a major breakthrough, Serbia arrested last week eight suspects of mass killings after the fall of the Bosnian town of Srebrenica in 1995. If they face court, it will be the biggest trial for war crimes in Serbia so far.

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14 January 2015

International courts are increasingly looking at ways to compensate victims of crimes for their suffering. For its first issue in 2015, IJT 173 is thus focusing on reparations. Our correspondents examine the reparations controversy at the ECCC, Cambodia's Khmer Rouge tribunal; developments at the ICC; disgruntled victims in northern Uganda; and the story of Srebrenica survivor Hasan Nuhanovic, who won a landmark civil case against the Dutch government for compensation.

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Entrance of Dutchbat compound in Potocari near Srebrenica. Copyright Joost van Egmond
13 January 2015 by Joost van Egmond, Sarajevo (Bosnia and Herzegovina)

Over a year after the highest court in the Netherlands held the Dutch state responsible for the fate of his father and brother, who were killed after the fall of the Bosnian town of Srebrenica in 1995, Hasan Nuhanovic still awaits satisfactory compensation. His case is often cited as crucial for damages claims to come, for Srebrenica and beyond.

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23 July 2014 by IJT

In a landmark verdict, a Dutch court ruled this week that The Netherlands is responsible for 300 of the more than 8,000 deaths in the 1995 Srebrenica massacre, because its peacekeeping force – Dutchbat – failed to protect them. 

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08 October 2014 by Stephanie van den Berg

A recent ruling by a Netherlands court on the responsibilities of peacekeepers has implications for future operations worldwide, says researcher Lenneke Sprik, who specializes in the laws governing peacekeeping and humanitarian interventions.

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