Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo

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Bosco Ntaganda, for whom the ICC pre-trial chamber unanimously confirmed all charges of sexual and gender-based crimes (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
06 April 2015 by Ella Sonja West, The Hague (The Netherlands)

At the International Criminal Court (ICC), prosecuting sexual and gender-based violence has been notoriously difficult. Documentary evidence has often proved insufficient and local officials, unwilling to cooperate. Despite such challenges, the Office of the Prosecutor (OTP), since Fatou Bensouda took over in 2012, has prioritized prosecution of such crimes.

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ICC Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda during the October 2014 status conferences concerning the status of cooperation between her office and Kenya (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
25 March 2015 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

This article examines the value the International Criminal Court is increasingly placing on digital data and other technology as a way to reduce reliance on witness testimony. It completes a series by Tjitske Lingsma on the challenges faced by the ICC's Office of the Prosecution. The first article looked at its problems with witnesses [IJT-176] and the second, with intermediaries [IJT-177].

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05 July 2004 by Thierry Cruvellier

On 23 June, the prosecutor of the International Criminal Court (ICC) Luis Moreno Ocampo announced he was opening his first investigations in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC). According to his press release, Ocampo has already been "carefully analysing the situation in DRC" since July 2003. But the new step, which marks the difference between a "preliminary analysis" and the opening of an investigation, is notable for the legal process that could lead to the first trials before the international court, and is highly significant in the current political context.

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17 November 2010 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo was once a business tycoon, a warlord, a vice-president - and currently still has a seat in DR Congo’s senate. But from Monday he may take his seat in the dock as the most high profile war crimes suspect at the International Criminal Court (ICC). Prosecutors say he bears responsibility for war crimes and crimes against humanity committed in the Central African Republic (CAR), whose citizens are closely following the controversial process.

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22 May 2006 by Emmanuel Chicon et Benjamin Bibas

On April 11, 2006, the Court of Cassation in Central African Republic (CAR) acknowledged that the International Criminal Court (ICC) has jurisdiction to try the primary perpetrators of the violent acts that accompanied General François Bozizé's first putsch attempt in October 2002. Bozizé finally took power during a successful coup d'état in March 2003 and was later elected president in spring 2005.

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14 May 2014 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

The International Criminal Court (ICC) is facing, for the first time, a case of offenses against the “administration of justice”, behind closed doors. Two lawyers for the ICC defendent Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo, plus two other persons, were arrested six months ago for allegedly bribing witnesses. With the unprecedented appointment of an ‘independent counsel’, the questions about how the prosecutor has investigated this case abound.

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19 November 2014 by Janet H. Anderson

Trial chamber judges heard closing arguments last week in the trial of Jean-Pierre Bemba Gombo, the former vice-president of Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC) facing charges of war crimes and crimes against humanity at the International Criminal Court. Bemba’s is the third trial to reach closing arguments at the ICC.