Joshua Arap Sang

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Kenyan vice-president William Ruto on the first day of his ICC trial in September 2013 (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
18 April 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Since judges threw out the case against Kenyan vice-president William Ruto and broadcaster Joshua arap Sang at the International Criminal Court (ICC) earlier this month there has been a lot of discussion that the case could somehow provide a script for other defendants on how to evade justice. In the Ruto Sang case the judges by majority agreed there was not enough evidence to continue with the trial but refused to acquit instead vacating the charges, leaving the possibility for the prosecutor to come back to the case if they find additional evidence. The decision to discontinue the case amid prosecution complaints of witness interference, follows the withdrawal of charges against Kenyan president Uhuru Kenyatta in March this year where similar accusations were made [IJT-172-176].

IJT spoke to Dov Jacobs, associate professor at Leiden University and a longstanding ICC observer who also works as a legal consultant before the court, about the ruling and its implications.

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13 April 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Luis Moreno Ocampo landed at Nairobi’s Jomo Kenyatta airport in May 2010 to listen to victims of the violence that swept Kenya three years ago. While there he pledged that by Christmas he would file charges against six ring-leaders and try them in two cases. 

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14 September 2011 by Judie Kaberia

As the first three of the ‘Ocampo six’ soldiered on through the tough, painstaking and crucial journey of defending themselves against allegations of crimes against humanity last week, many Kenyans have high hopes that the International Criminal Court (ICC) process has opened a window of delivering justice for the 2008 post-election violence. 

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28 September 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Uhuru Kenyatta is sure his file at the International Criminal Court does not contain anything that implicates him in crimes against humanity. “We go to The Hague in the full expectation that justice will prevail and the truth emerges. We are innocent,” he said ahead of a series of hearings that may bring him to trial. 

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12 October 2011 by Judie Kaberia

The just-concluded confirmation of charges hearings against six Kenyans at the International Criminal Court are having an increasing impact in Kenya ahead of presidential elections in 2012. The six face charges over crimes committed during the post-election violence in Kenya in 2008.

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ICC Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda during the October 2014 status conferences concerning the status of cooperation between her office and Kenya (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
25 March 2015 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

This article examines the value the International Criminal Court is increasingly placing on digital data and other technology as a way to reduce reliance on witness testimony. It completes a series by Tjitske Lingsma on the challenges faced by the ICC's Office of the Prosecution. The first article looked at its problems with witnesses [IJT-176] and the second, with intermediaries [IJT-177].

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02 February 2011 by Linawati Sidarto

Radio journalist Joshua Arap Sang was the only non-politician among the six Kenyans named by the International Criminal Court in December as the alleged masterminds of the country’s post-election violence. Experts, however, warn against comparisons between Kenya’s Kass FM and Rwanda’s notorious RTLM.