TRC

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06 July 2011 by Bram Posthumus

Liberia’s reconstruction is going full steam ahead – but the people appear to be left behind. 

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26 September 2011 by Mariângela Guimarães

When I first watched ‘A Clockwork Orange,’ Stanley Kubrick’s dystopian black comedy, at the cinema in Brazil, years after it was originally released, I was still a teenager. I remember finding it funny that black dots popped up on the screen to cover up sexual acts and parts of the body that we weren’t supposed to see. This was at the end of the 1970s and Brazil was under a military dictatorship that did things much worse than censoring film scenes. Every time I mention something from those years, like that experience at the movies, I notice that many people, and even younger Brazilians, seem to forget that the country was once ruled by a repressive regime.

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24 March 2010 by Bram Posthumus

War ended in Liberia almost seven years ago. It has left scars in the land and the people. The country is slowly recovering and questions regarding justice and impunity are being addressed – but not to everyone’s satisfaction.

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24 March 2010 by Don Kirk

South Korea’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission (TRC), founded in 2005 as an independent agency with a broad mandate to cover a century of abuse, faces dissolution by the country’s conservative government. The TRC is likely to last another few months wrapping up investigations and then fade away, a relic of the decade of liberal leadership that began with the inauguration of President Kim Dae-jung in February 1998.

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10 March 2010 by Elles van Gelder

South African president Jacob Zuma must consult with victims before issuing any pardons for prisoners convicted of politically motivated crimes during the apartheid era. That’s according to a ruling by the country’s constitutional court.

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16 February 2011 by Michel Maas

In the aftermath of the May 2010 mass street protests in Bangkok which ended in a bloody crackdown by the Thai army, the government formed the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. However, half a year after its formation, the commission is riddled with problems.

 

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02 February 2011 by Donald Kirk

South Korea’s Truth and Reconciliation Commission in December concluded its historic exploration into the brutality of mass killing by both sides during the Korean War in an atmosphere of frustration and controversy.

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30 September 2009 by John Kollie

The appearance of former Liberian president Charles Taylor before the United Nations backed Special Court for Sierra Leone (SCSL) in The Hague is generating huge interest and excitement in his home country.

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15 December 2010 by Leiuh Asuman Wakida and Priscilla Nadunga

Almost seven years after Uganda gave the names of the top Lord’s Resistance Army commanders to the International Criminal Court, the country remains divided as to which path should be taken towards justice. Some Ugandan public figures are again calling for the formation of a truth and reconciliation body.

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20 December 2004 by INGRID SEYMAN

They are 35,000 men and women, imprisoned under the regime of General Pinochet, who were abused, tortured or raped, then silenced and forgotten by the Chilean institutions and courts. In early December, the publication of the report on Torture and Political Imprisonment under the military dictatorship has finally put an end to the denial of these crimes by granting them official recognition as victims of the dictatorship.

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