Uhuru Kenyatta

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13 April 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Luis Moreno Ocampo landed at Nairobi’s Jomo Kenyatta airport in May 2010 to listen to victims of the violence that swept Kenya three years ago. While there he pledged that by Christmas he would file charges against six ring-leaders and try them in two cases. 

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28 September 2011 by Thijs Bouwknegt

Uhuru Kenyatta is sure his file at the International Criminal Court does not contain anything that implicates him in crimes against humanity. “We go to The Hague in the full expectation that justice will prevail and the truth emerges. We are innocent,” he said ahead of a series of hearings that may bring him to trial. 

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12 October 2011 by Judie Kaberia

The just-concluded confirmation of charges hearings against six Kenyans at the International Criminal Court are having an increasing impact in Kenya ahead of presidential elections in 2012. The six face charges over crimes committed during the post-election violence in Kenya in 2008.

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Kenya's TJRC "had no political champions," says Mutuma Ruteere, director of the Centre for Human Rights and Policy Studies in Nairobi (Photo: Flickr/unisgeneva/UN Photo/Jean-Marc Ferré)
04 May 2015 by Abdullahi Boru, Nairobi (Kenya)

Earlier this year Kenyan President Uhuru Kenyatta in his state of the union address not only apologized on behalf of the state for past human rights abuses, but also announced a three-year, 10 billion Kenyan-shilling (96 million-euro) “restorative justice” fund for victims of such atrocities. But critics say much is unclear about the plan and how it will co-exist with reparations processes and procedures envisaged by the now defunct Truth, Justice and Reconciliation Commission (TJRC) [IJT-162].

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ICC Prosecutor Fatou Bensouda during the October 2014 status conferences concerning the status of cooperation between her office and Kenya (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
25 March 2015 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

This article examines the value the International Criminal Court is increasingly placing on digital data and other technology as a way to reduce reliance on witness testimony. It completes a series by Tjitske Lingsma on the challenges faced by the ICC's Office of the Prosecution. The first article looked at its problems with witnesses [IJT-176] and the second, with intermediaries [IJT-177].

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President Kenyatta and his defence team, with lawyer Steven Kay in first row, at 8 December 2014 status conference (Photo: Flickr/ICC-CPI)
24 February 2015 by Tjitske Lingsma, The Hague (The Netherlands)

This is the first in a series of articles delving into the challenges faced by prosecutors at the International Criminal Court. In our next issue, Tjitske Lingsma focuses on the use of intermediaries in situation countries. In the third article, we examine the growing importance of technological evidence, like phone records and computer data, to reduce the reliance on witness testimony.

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01 December 2010 by Claire Wachira

Kenya expects the International Criminal Court this month to hand out six arrest warrants to alleged perpetrators of the country’s post-election violence. Public speculation is rife, and the looming warrants are causing tension between Kenya’s two main political parties.