Vojislav Seselj

article
Serb ultra-nationalist politician Vojislav Seselj (Photo: Twitter/@seselj_vojislav)
31 March 2016 by Stephanie van den Berg, The Hague (The Netherlands)

Serb ultra-nationalist politician Vojislav Seselj was acquitted Thursday of all nine charges of crimes against humanity and war crimes and is now a free man presiding judge Jean-Claude Antonetti of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) ruled. Seselj, already provisionally released on health grounds, was not present in court.

article
A medical examining room at the ICTY (Photo: Flickr/ICTY)
21 April 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

The on-going controversy over the provisional release of Serbian ultra nationalist Vojislav Seselj [IJT-179] from the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY) has recast the spotlight on how courts deal with ailing accused. It also begets a fundamental question: what determines if someone is fit to stand trial?

article
Supporters await the arrival of Vojislav Seselj at Belgrade airport after his provisional release in November 2014 (Photo: Joost van Egmond)
07 April 2015 by Stephanie van den Berg, Belgrade (Serbia)

The Yugoslavia tribunal announced a new twist in its drawn-out case against Vojislav Seselj, when the appeals chamber ordered the trial chamber to revoke the provisional release of the firebrand Serbian politician. But it is unclear how the court might be able secure his return.

article
05 October 2011 by Radosa Milutinovic

It was two years ago that judge Patrick Robinson, President of the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), warned in a speech to the UN Security Council that contempt proceedings had a “negative impact on the expeditious progress of trials”.

article
28 October 2009 by Sebastiaan Gottlieb

Few people expected Radovan Karadzic to show up to the start of his trial on Monday. He had already announced his intention not to attend a few days earlier in a written submission to the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). The former President of the Serb Republic in Bosnia stayed away to protest the fact that he hadn't been given more time to prepare his case. The pre-trial and appeals chambers rejected his request for a 10-month postponement earlier this month.

article
10 October 2005 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

For the last five weeks, at Slobodan Milosevic's invitation, the ultra nationalist Vojislav Seselj, former opposition leader and deputy prime minister of Serbia during the war in the former Yugoslavia, has testified in his defence. Since 23 August, Seselj, who is also accused by the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), has presented as facts opinions previously expressed by Milosevic. When the judges asked for evidence, Seselj replied that it existed but that he did not have it.

article
05 November 2007 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

After four and a half years of proceedings, the trial of Vojislav Seselj will open at The Hague on November 7. For the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY), the former president of the Serbian Radical Party (SRS) represents the most important political figure to be tried since the death of former Serbian president Slobodan Milosevic in March 2006. One year ago, the appeals chamber confirmed that Seselj had the right to self representation. But since then, the accused has refused to supply information regarding his financial situation and the tribunal is refusing to reimburse his defense fees.

article
18 December 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

"For the Court the procedural problems have really started now," ICTY Registrar Hans Holthuis commented on Friday December 8. Vojislav Seselj, president of the Serbian Radical Party (SRS) and one of the most prominent defendants before the Hague-based court, has just ended the hunger strike he began twenty-eight days ago to protest his Court-imposed lawyer and maintain the right to defend himself. The Appeals Chamber upheld his right.

article
06 November 2006 by HEIKELINA VERRIJN STUART

Since the death of Slobodan Milosevic, ultranationalist leader Vojislav Seselj is without doubt the best-known accused standing before the International Criminal Tribunal for the former Yugoslavia (ICTY). On 3 November, Seselj - the "scandal monger", as he called himself during his testimony in the Milosevic trial - became suddenly very polite in court. Although on 20 October the court authorized him to defend himself, the Appeals Chamber warned Seselj that "should his self-representation substantially obstruct the proper and expeditious proceedings in this case, the Trial Chamber will be justified in promptly assigning him counsel".